True Growth Counselling - Formerly Inspired Living

Winner of the African Corporate Award of Excellence - Best in Psychological Counselling 2016

Blog of the Month - Life in Recovery

Addiction in South Africa is an ever-increasing problem and as it is stigmatised, families and individuals frequently attempt to battle it largely in secret. Families are relieved when the person, battling the addiction, is admitted onto an inpatient treatment program but anxiety quickly resurfaces when the discharge date approaches. Recovery begins the moment users decide to get help for addiction, but it doesn’t end after rehab.

During rehabilitation, one acquires various tools and skills, but an inpatient facility is a far more secure, monitored and secluded environment. Re-entering society, so to speak, and the normal stresses of daily life can all pose a serious risk to the individual still in the infant days of their recovery.

The culture of addiction needs to be replaced with a culture of recovery and this process requires time, an accountability structure, family support and perseverance. This is where a reintegration program proves valuable in assisting the individual on how to utilise the tools, how to problem solve and how to effectively deal with life’s challenges without relapsing or cross-addicting. Many addicts, seeking to disengage from the culture of addiction, find themselves alone, vulnerable and in need of guidance. Frequently this is when they will return to what they know.

Treatment professionals are the cement which initially assists individuals battling an addiction to bind to the new culture of recovery. Effective recovery involves the proverbial statement of “taking one day at a time”. Addiction takes a tremendous toll on the body as well as the mind, so it is important to apply the rules of healthy living. Ensure that you eat regular, well-balanced, nutritious meals; get sufficient, good-quality sleep each night so you wake up refreshed, renewed and ready to take on the day; and schedule time to be physically active and to de-stress each day.  This all ensures that you not only regain your health, but that you also have the fortitude to remain sober, in early recovery and beyond.

As addiction affects the entire family, it is key that they form part of the recovery process and that they address their own need to heal. Family members frequently enable addictive behaviour and once equipped with more information pertaining to addiction, they feel far more empowered and are able to identity manipulation and to resist it far more effectively.

“Recovery is not simple abstinence. It’s about healing the brain, remembering how to feel, learning how to make good decisions, becoming the kind of person who can engage in healthy relationships, cultivating the willingness to accept help from others, daring to be honest, and opening up to doing.” ~ Debra Jay


 

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Abusive Relationships

 

 

 Warning Signs of an Abuser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vvzfYWdDo0